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Articles
Daily Mail: How Men Should Think Like Women In Order To Succeed

The Daily Mail wrote a piece on The Athena Doctrine. Read the full text below, and check out the article here.

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Women have long been encouraged to take on masculine traits such as being assertive, decisive and selfish in order to succeed.

But a new book believes the tide is turning is against 'male thinking' and that men should actually be more like women in order to be successful.

In the Athena Doctrine, named after the Greek Goddess of wisdom, authors John Gerzema and Michael D'Antonio write that 'all over the world, people are deploying feminine thinking and values to make their lives, and the world, better.'

The writers, whose book is sub-headed 'how women (and the men who think like them) will rule the future', surveyed 64,000 people across the globe to find out what makes them happy and gives their life meaning.

They found that across the continents and cultural backgrounds, people are suffering from 'extended anxiety' - worrying that institutions have become too powerful and society unfair.

And the reason why they feel this way? Men.

When questioning people from Asia, Europe and South America, they found that 66 per cent agreed that the world would be a better place if men thought more like women.

Meanwhile, 57 per cent of adults said they were dissatisfied with the conduct of men in their country.

The authors write that their research shows: 'Everywhere, people are frustrated by a world long dominated by codes of male thinking and behavior: Codes of control, aggression and black-and-white thinking that have contributed to many of the problems we face today, from wars and income inequality to reckless risk-taking and scandal.

'In fact, two-thirds of people feel the world would be a better place if men thought more like women-including 79 per cent of Japanese men; 76 per cent of French and Brazilians and 70 per cent of Germans.'

The writers came to their conclusions after first asking half their sample of 32,000 people around the world to classify 125 different human behavioral traits as either masculine, feminine or neither.

Some of the traits predominantly classified as masculine included pride, arrogance and being career-driven, gutsy, aggressive and competitive.

Meanwhile, the feminine traits included being honest, humble, creative, family-orientated, adaptable, sensitive and trust-worthy.

The researchers presented the lists of traits to the other half of their sample without telling them if they were defined as masculine or feminine. They asked them to rate the importance of the traits on leadership, success, morality and happiness.

As a result, they found 'traditionally feminine leadership and values are now more popular than the macho paradigm of the past.' They added: 'The most innovative among us are breaking away from traditional structures to be more flexible, collaborative and nurturing. And both men and women from Medellin to Nairobi are adopting this style, which emphasizes cooperation, long-term thinking, and flexibility.'

Since it was released last month, the Athena Doctrine has become a New York Times bestseller.

John Gerzema told Hello Giggles how he came up with the idea to write the book.

'Denise Morrison, the CEO of Campbell's, was hosting a mentoring event for young women and asked me to speak. And the room was filled with all of this positive energy of nurturing and collaboration. And it occurred to me you probably couldn't put sixty men into a room like this and get the same result,' he said.

He added that the data and real world examples collated in the book proves there is 'a new way to solve today's toughest problems in business, education, government, and more' by adopting feminine traits.

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