In our @HarrisPoll w @Forbes 64% aware of #Omicron; 78% of those, worry it will evade existing vaccines incl.(81%)… https://t.co/VA1hUikHh0
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Check out the latest article in my newsletter: America This Week: Omicron Arrives, Boosters Rise, Borders Close, Wi… https://t.co/flrjwdSGR9
How to Talk to Your Family About Cryptocurrency #happythanksgiving https://t.co/FS1yhUh1hO
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Lessons from the Lance Armstrong Debacle

The recent news about Lance Armstrong put an end to years of speculation from sports fans everywhere. And no one was surprised. Lance's tentative confession and attempts at limiting his responsibility points to a bigger question: why did we care so much about this guy? Why was he turned into such a hero when we all knew, doping or not, that he wasn't a very good person? How did Lance shrouded in controversy for years become famous enough to amass over $125 million of net worth. The answer is simple. Because we as a society value victory above all and success trumps hard work, ethics, values, respect.

There are implications to our heroification of victors that go far beyond which athletes we root for. In the start up era, success is in trying, in showing up. When we only acclaim those with the $1 billion IPOs, we not discourage entrepreneurship jeopardizing our future wellbeing. Faced with challenges like global warming, hunger, war, success will come incrementally, painfully and will only happen when we accept the inevitability of failure and still show up.

Dr. Ijad Madisch, a Harvard-trained virologist, was stumped on a research project, but when he turned to his colleagues for advice, he was rebuked for admitting his shortcomings. Instead of letting his failure discourage him, it fueled his innovation. He created ResearchGate, a platform for scientific collaboration. By bringing together scientists from around the world with different specialties, he provides a space where problems can be solved quicker and scientific advancements can be made faster. We win together not alone.

As Israel’s President, Shimon Peres faces the prospect of failure each day. He has to negotiate foreign relationships, manage a country’s finances and policy and maintain a strong leadership identity. But President Peres recognizes the importance of humility and understanding one’s shortcomings. His advice to leaders around the world is, “Don’t exaggerate. You are not so great. You are not so wise.” True success, whether as a political or business leader, means acknowledging vulnerability and accepting the possibility of failure.

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