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How Beehives are Empowering Communities

A co-founder of Golden Company, Zoe Palmer blends business with a community-minded agenda. A social enterprise described as “part workshop, part kitchen, part stock cupboard, part library,” Golden provides a welcome gathering place for at-risk youth, empowering them with the opportunity to make a difference, learn critical skills, and, most importantly, feel a strong sense of self-confidence and community.

At the core of the Golden community are bee hives, which not only provide a product pipeline for Golden—the company sells honey and other bee-based goods at public markets—but also are emblematic of two critical feminine attributes: interconnectedness and collaboration. Golden Company, Palmer believes, can help people balance the head, heart and the hands in a self-sustaining way.

In one of Golden Company’s programs, she asked the at-risk children she works with to teach investment bankers to care for beehives. Above and beyond the fascinating interaction between these two very different socioeconomic groups, the program taught bankers (and the children) a lesson in custodial caring for society. The bankers were so impressed they put a beehive on the top of the London Stock Exchange.

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